Saturday, February 25, 2012

National Postal Museum Stamp - Colorano Silk Card



Colorano Silk Cachets is known mainly for its First Day Cover Envelopes, but in the past Colorano also produced Non-silk Maxi-Cards (1965 - 1971) and Silk Souvenir Cards (1971 - 1996). The card above is a Colorado Silk Souvenir Card. The illustration on the top of the card is printed on silk and is surrounded by a shiny gold embossed border. The card is the same size and weight as a postcard, but it has no printing on the back.

Ray Novak was the cachet maker responsible for Colorano cachets. The name "Colorano" is a combination of letters from the words color, Ray, and Novak. You can read more about Ray Novak and his first day covers here. The name "Colorano" and the printing process were sold to Paul Schmid in 1995, and Colorano Silk first day covers are still being produced on envelopes.

The stamp on this card is one of the four designs in a se-tenant block issued to commemorate the opening of the Smithsonian's National Postal Museum in 1993. The designs of the four stamps in the National Postal Museum Issue feature historical moments in U.S. postal history that give a sense of traveling through time. This stamp has a Civil War soldier, Concord stagecoach, and pony express rider representing the 19th century.




The stamp representing the 18th century features Benjamin Franklin (an early American printer, postmaster and statesmen), a printing press, mail rider, and Independence Hall. The stamp representing the twentieth century features airmail pilot Charles Lindbergh, a railway mail car, a 1931 Model A Ford mail truck, and JN-4H "Jenny" bi-plane stamp. The fourth stamp features the art of letter writing, using memorable words from a California gold rush letter, four prized U.S stamps, an undated postmark, and a barcode representing contemporary mail processing technology.

This is a post for Sunday Stamps at Viridian's Postcard Blog




10 comments:

  1. Great post! I have not seen this set of stamps before and I don't know how I missed them back in 1993 or so! Thank you for the links too - very interesting. And thank you for participating.

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  2. I have again learned about something new. Now, I want one of these silk cards!

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  3. Thank you for this educational post. I loved the stamps as well as the write-up. :)

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  4. nice blog, I wish to receive cards as beautiful as your, I do postcrossing, i´m following your blog, visit my blog and follow me
    http://worldpostcardsblog.blogspot.com/

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  5. I'm so glad I followed your National Museum link. What a glorious way to show stamps.

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  6. The silk covers are lovely. Thanks for the links.

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  7. It's interesting to see stamps within stamps. I hadn't heard of these silk cards before.

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  8. Great post, insight and design. Thanks for sharing!

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  9. I've been wondering what maxi cards are--I keep seeing reference to them but wasn't sure. More new lingo--will have to check out your links. Lovely and stamps!

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  10. I love your post, as always! There's always something new to learn - silk cards.

    Postcards Crossing

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